Persian Cooking Class, Spring Edition: Easter & Norouz, March 17th

lezione di cucina persiana per pasqua - persian cooking lesson RomeThe arrival of March is means Spring is just a few steps away. Although we’re still partly covered under snow and and it still feels quite wintery, it’s time to ready for Norouz, the Persian new year celebrated on Spring equinox, followed shortly after by Easter

Spring celebration food everywhere is the new seasonal greens and celebration of growth.

Although the classic Persian dish to celebrate Norouz is Sabzi Polo ba MahiPersian herby pilaf served with fish — there are also other dishes that are prepared with fresh produce of Spring.

lezione di cucina persiana per pasqua - persian cooking lesson RomeThis Persian feast menù is completely green in color in honour of Spring celebrations. There’s Kuku SabziPersian herby frittata — that is a classic Norouz dish in Tehran. Then there will be Baghali Polo — Persian pilaf with fava beans and lots of dill — that will be served with lamb shanks, cooked with saffron and turmeric. These dishes and the rest of the Menù are Persian inspirations that can brighten up your Easter lunch/brunch for a feast with a middle eastern flavor.

When

Saturday March 17th, at 10 am

Where

Latteria Studio

Via di Ponziano 29, 00152, Rome (Trastevere) Continue reading

SOLD OUT! Persian Cooking Lesson, Christmas Edition, December 2nd

Persian Cooking Class in Rome

Your response to my debut Persian cooking class at Latteria Studio has been incredible! The class sold out in less than a week. And since there were so many of you that were interested, I decided to add a new date for another Persian Cooking Class, with a slightly different menù for the festive Season. The Christmas Edition features pomegranates, pistachios, almonds and walnuts, festivity favorites in the west, and celebration food in Iran.

Please join me on Saturday morning on December 2nd, to chat, talk about the basics of Persian cooking, getting in the mood for Christmas and get our hands busy chopping, cutting, braising and stewing.

Persian Cooking Class in Rome
Persian Cooking Class in Rome

When

Saturday December 2nd, at 10 am

Where

Latteria Studio

Via di Ponziano 29, 00152, Rome (Trastevere)

Cost

€79 per person

SOLD OUT

includes cooking lesson, four course lunch, wine and water

Booking

This class has been sold out. Booking is no longer possibile. For priority booking for future courses, write to info{at}labnoo.com.

Menu

To start

Persian Cheese Platter with herbs (vegetarian)

Main Courses

Tah-chin Kadoo: Persian rice cake with pumpkin and caramelised onions (vegetarian)

Fried dates Frittata

Persian Jeweled rice with pistachios, almonds, barberries and candied orange zest (vegan)

Festive Saffron Chicken with Pomegranates and Walnuts

Sides

Mint and Pomegranate salad

Dessert

Persian Love Cake with roses and pistachios

served with cardamom tea

For any other info or details don’t hesitate to contact me! You can find and share content about this cooking class at #PersianCookingClassRome. Continue reading

Iranian Food Writers on Persian New Year and Norouz, & “Sabzi Polo Mahi” (Herby Pilaf & Turmeric Fried Fish)

Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-13

I used to absolutely hate fish as a child. While I was typically a good eater, I would not so much as touch fish. On ordinary days, it was not much of a problem: Not so many Iranian dishes are based on seafood, since only two small parts of the cat-shaped country at the north and south touch the sea. But on Norooz, the Iranian celebration that marks the beginning of the new year on the first day of spring, my fish-hating habit meant disaster.

On March 20th, the last day of the year, Iranians around the world will eat Sabzi Polo ba Mahi, a fragrant pilaf with herbs (like chives, parsley, dill, cilantro, fenugreek) and sometimes fresh garlic, served alongside fish. The type of fish and its exact preparation varies from region to region and among families. In the northern parts of Iran, the Caspian White Fish is a renowned favorite, while in the south, fish come from the Persian Gulf and strong flavors like tamarind are added.

Back in my childhood days, I ended up eating my herby pilaf with a sad frittata, hastily made by my fed-up mom who had lost hope of feeding me the precious fish. It wasn’t exactly the most propitious start of the new year.

This is how the story of how I recreate recipes and rituals of Norouz in Rome begins in an article commissioned for Food52. Please read the whole story here and tell me what you think. 

Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-2

Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-11
Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-17

Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-3
Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-24
Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-10

Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-9
Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-21
Persian Herby Pilaf and Fish - Sabzi Polo Mahi | Lab Noon by Saghar Setareh-16

This year, I am really happy that major food publishings have dedicated articles, recipes and stories to the Persian new year and Norouz. The truth is that this beautiful, ancient and rich celebration that is celebrated by some 190 million people celebrate (from north of India to Turkey, with Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan and other countries in the middle), has been so much in the shadow.

My post for the annual roundup of the Persian food bloggers is a homage to the Iranian food writers around the world who have taken the responsibility of talking about our beautiful Iran, that is oh so much more than a banned country. So This is not one of my long posts with the long, multi-chapter story (you can read that on Food52), but a list of links for your Norouz reading and recipes. You can also find the recipe of my Sabzi Polo Mahi, the national dish of Norouz in the bottom. So enjoy reading, Happy 1396 and Sale No Mobarak! Continue reading